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Don Saliers, Joyce Burkhalter Flueckiger, Dianne Stewart Diakité, and Don E. Seeman

Melissa D. Browning, Edith Chamwama, Eunice Kamaara, Sussy Gumo Kurgat, Damaris Parsitau, Emily Reimer-Barry, Elisabeth Vasko, and Jeanine Viau

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Thomas Fabisiak is a doctoral student in Emory University's Graduate Division of Religion in the Comparative Literature and Religion course of study.
Susanna Snyder is a Post-Doctoral Fellow in the Initiative in Religious Practices and Practical Theology, Emory University. Her areas of interest include immigration, refugees and globalization.
Susannah Laramee Kidd is a doctoral candidate in Comparative Literature and Religion at Emory University, working on an ethnography of women's Bible studies and feminist theories of intersubjective identity.
Frank Lechner is Professor of Sociology at Emory University. Recent publications include Globalization: The Making of World Society and The Netherlands: Globalization and National Identity.
An ordained Baptist minister within the historic black church, Jermaine McDonald is a doctoral student in the Ethics and Society course of study in Emory's Graduate Division of Religion. He is interested in religious rhetoric within progressive/liberal U.S. political discourse and the ways in which black Baptist churches have historically and contemporarily connected church mission and liberationist ideals with public/political goals. McDonald has a B.S. in Computer Science from the University of Virginia and an M.Div. from the Samuel DeWitt Proctor School of Theology at Virginia Union University. Prior to doctoral studies, he worked as a web-based systems developer and as a hospital and hospice chaplain.
Elana Jefferson is a doctoral candidate in the Person, Community, and Religious Life program in the Graduate Division of Religion at Emory University, whose research interests explore African religious communities and their material cultures.
Katy Shrout is an adjunct professor at the Candler School of Theology at Emory University. She has a Ph.D. in American religious history and culture from Emory and a masters in documentary film from University of California at Berkeley. Her dissertation is a cultural history of weddings as sacred practices for North American women, 1840-1970.
Jason Mahn teaches Christian theology as an assistant professor at Augustana College, Rock Island, IL. His first book, Fortunate Fallibility: Kierkegaard and the Power of Sin, should be appearing from Oxford University Press in 2011.
Peter Gottschalk is professor of religion and director of the South Asian Studies Certificate at Wesleyan University, Middletown, Connecticut. He is author of Beyond Hindu and Muslim: Multiple Identity in Narratives from Rural India and co-author of Islamophobia: Making Muslims the Enemy. The two authors have also recently co-edited Engaging South Asian Religions: Boundaries, Appropriations, and Resistances (forthcoming).
Mathew N. Schmalz is associate professor of religious studies and director of the College Honors Program at the College of the Holy Cross, Worcester, Massachusetts. His research interests include South Asian religions, global Catholicisms and Modern Religious Movements.The two authors have also recently co-edited Engaging South Asian Religions: Boundaries, Appropriations, and Resistances (forthcoming).
A PhD candidate in the American Religious Cultures course of study, Donna S. Mote is an ethnographer of religious cultures and practices. The focus of her dissertation project is the religious culture of Shingleroof Camp Meeting in Henry County, Georgia, and she is currently at work on a documentary film about Shingleroof. Much of Mote's work involves identifying and analyzing implicit practices of ancestor veneration in US contexts. She places such practices in conversation with more explicit ancestor-venerating practices in non-US religious cultures, such as that of Obon, the Buddhist Festival of the Dead, in Japan. Animating her work are a focus on the interplay of practices, memory, bodies, and place and an interest in new approaches to religious places and spaces.
David M. Mellott is Assistant Professor of Practical Theology and Director of Ministerial Formation at Lancaster Theological Seminary. As a theologian, teacher, and spiritual director, Mellott is committed to supporting and nurturing Christian communities that empower people to live more authentically as they seek to love God, neighbor, and self more deeply. Mellott's doctoral work focused on the religious practices of the Penitentes in northern New Mexico as a way to explore the relationship between the spiritual practices of a community and the theology that emerges from that community.
Shively T. J. Smith is a second year doctoral student in Emory University's New Testament Studies Program. Originally from Kentucky, she completed her undergraduate degree in Nashville, TN at Fisk University. She received her master's degrees from both Emory's Candler School of Theology and Columbia Theological Seminary. Currently, Shively's interests include examining the speeches of Luke-Acts through the lenses of narrative criticism, historiography, and memory studies. She is also interested in the constructions of diaspora identities in texts such as James, the Petrine corpus, and the Daniel court tales.
Letitia Campbell is a social ethicist and a doctoral candidate in Ethics and Society in the Emory University Graduate Division of Religion. She was a founding editor of Practical Matters.
John Senior is a doctoral student in the Ethics and Society course of study in Emory University's Graduate Division of Religion (GDR). He is also a minor concentrator in the GDR's Initiative in Religious Practice and Practical Theology. He is finishing his dissertation entitled "Political Vocation and Agency: Constructing the Moral Self Through Political Work," in which he elaborates a Christian political anthropology. His work brings an interdisciplinary focus to the fields of political theology and ethics, political theory, and the sociology of religion.
Arthi Devarajan is a doctoral candidate at Emory University in the West and South Asian Religions course of study in the Graduate Division of Religion.
Jennifer M. McBride received her doctorate in Religious Studies from the University of Virginia in 2008. She was a 2008/2009 Postdoctoral Fellow in Religious Practices and Practical Theology, hosted by Candler School of Theology and the Graduate Division of Religion at Emory University. At present, she is a Visiting Lecturer at Candler School of Theology where she serves as the Atlanta Theological Association's Director of the Certificate in Theological Studies at Metro State Prison for Women. She is the author of The Church for the World: A Theology of Public Witness (Oxford UP, forthcoming) and co-editor of Bonhoeffer and King: Their Legacies and Import for Christian Social Thought (Fortress Press, August 2010).
Kate Lassiter is a doctoral candidate in Religion, Psychology, and Culture and a fellow in the Theology and Practice program in the Graduate Department of Religion at Vanderbilt University. She researches healing and transformation, lived religious experience, and is dogged by questions about wisdom. She is an avid reader of mystery novels and a jazz aficionado.
Don E. Saliers recently retired as William R. Cannon Distinguished Professor of Theology and Worship and director of the master of sacred music program at Emory University. After attending Ohio Wesleyan University, he earned his B.D. degree and a Ph. D. from Yale University. Saliers is currently writing on liturgy and theological aesthetics. Previous publications include: Filled with Light (2008), Music and Theology (2007), A Song to Sing, a Life to Live (2004), coauthored with daughter Emily Saliers; The Conversation Matters (1999), coacuthor; Human Disability and the Service of God (1998), coauthor; Worship Come To Its Senses (1996); Worship As Theology (1994); Christian Spirituality III (1989), coeditor with critical introduction; Handbook For the Christian Year (1986, 1992); K. Barth's Prayer (1985), coeditor with critical introduction; Worship and Spirituality (1984); and Soul in Paraphrase: Prayer and Religious Affections (1980, 1991). Having published over 125 articles and book chapters, he has lectured widely in colleges, universities and churches. Dr. Saliers has been organist and musical director of the Sunday liturgy at Cannon Chapel since 1975, and is an active composer. He is an oblate of Saint John’s Abbey, Collegeville, Minnesota.
Joyce Burkhalter Flueckiger earned her Ph.D. in South Asian Language and Literature from the University of Wisconsin. She specializes in performance studies and anthropology of religion. She is the author of Gender and Genre in the Folklore of Middle India and In Amma's Healing Room: Gender & Vernacular Islam in South India. She is currently writing a book on a South Indian goddess tradition, titled When the World Becomes Female. She is also the co-editor of Oral Epics in India and Boundaries of the Text: Epic Performances in South and Southeast Asia. Flueckiger’s seminars and courses include: Performance and Ethnography in West and South Asia; Life History Narratives and Methods; Women, Religion and Ethnography; Dance and Embodied Knowledge in the Indian Context, Modern Hinduism; and Religion, Health and Healing.
Dianne M. Stewart Diakité. Received her B.A. from Colgate University, her M.Div. from Harvard Divinity School, and her Ph.D. in Theology from Union Theological Seminary. She is the author of Three Eyes for the Journey: African Dimensions of the Jamaican Religious Experience (Oxford University Press, 2005). She has taught previously at Macalester College, St. Paul, MN and at the College of the Holy Cross, Worcester, MA. Her teaching and research focus upon theologies and religious practices of the African diaspora with special emphases on Black/womanist theologies, and African-derived religions.
Don Seeman is associate professor in the Department of Religion and the Tam Institute for Jewish Studies at Emory. He is a social and medical anthropologist who publishes broadly in ritual theory, the phenomenology of lived experience and the anthropology of suffering, as well as Jewish thought. His ethnography One People, One Blood: Ethiopian-Israelis and the Return to Judaism (Rutgers, 2009) was the inaugural volume in a new series on Jewish Cultures of the World. In addition Don currently chairs the interdisciplinary doctoral program in Jewish Religious Cultures at Emory and participates in the Religion and Public Health Collaborative.
Ashley Coleman is a third year Ph.D. candidate in Religion at Emory University. Her field of study is Person, Community and Religious Life and she is a concentrator in Religious Practices and Practical Theology. Her project explores religious experience, moral development and black identity development for Afro-Puerto Ricans.
Elaine Graham is the Grosvenor Research Professor of Practical Theology at the University of Chester. Her latest book is Words Made Flesh: Writings in Practical and Pastoral Theology (SCM Press, 2009).
Melissa Browning is a doctoral candidate in Christian Ethics at Loyola University Chicago. Her current academic project focuses on the lived experiences of HIV positive women in Mwanza, Tanzania.
Luke Whitmore is a doctoral candidate in the West and South Asian Religions course of study of the Graduate Division of Religion at Emory University. His dissertation, entitled "In Pursuit of Maheshvara: Understanding Kedarnath as Place and as Tirtha," is a critically and phenomenologically inflected anthropology of place focused on the Hindu pilgrimage site of Kedarnath, located high up in the north Indian Himalayas. Whitmore has studied Hebrew in Jerusalem, Greek in Athens, and Hindi and Sanskrit in India. He is particularly drawn to theorizing the relationships between place, image, narrative, deity, pilgrimage, and tourism. His other academic interests include visual culture and religion in South Asia, Jewish studies, theories of myth, the study of religion in the university, cultural geography, and the anthropologies of religion and experience.
Lerone Martin is a PhD candidate at Emory in the American Religious Cultures course of study of the Graduate Division of Religion. His research interests include the history of American religion and culture and twentieth-century African American cultural practices. His dissertation, entitled "Selling to the Souls of Black Folk," is an historical analysis of religious commodification and mass mediated religion in the United States and its relationship to capitalist consumerism. Desiring to utilize education for empowerment, Martin has become involved in various community education projects, serving as an educational consultant for continuing education and recidivism at Sing Sing New York State Prison and teaching at the Metro State Prison in Georgia.
Todd David Whitmore is Associate Professor of Christian Ethics in the Department of Theology and Faculty Fellow in the Kroc Institute for International Peace Studies at the University of Notre Dame. He is also co-founder and president of PeaceHarvest (peaceharvest.org), a nongovernmental organization that combines agricultural development and peacebuilding in northern Uganda and South Sudan. He has been doing fieldwork in the region since 2005.
Jennifer M. Beste is an associate professor of theological ethics at Xavier University in Cincinnati, Ohio. She is author of God and the Victim: Traumatic Intrusions on Grace and Freedom (2007). In addition to research interests in trauma and Christian theology, feminist ethics, and medical ethics, she is presently writing a book on Catholic children and Christian ethics.
John Senior is a doctoral student in the Ethics and Society course of study in Emory University's Graduate Division of Religion (GDR). He is also a minor concentrator in the GDR's Initiative in Religious Practice and Practical Theology. He is finishing his dissertation entitled "Political Vocation and Agency: Constructing the Moral Self Through Political Work," in which he elaborates a Christian political anthropology. His work brings an interdisciplinary focus to the fields of political theology and ethics, political theory, and the sociology of religion.
Annie Hardison-Moody is a doctoral student in the Person, Community, and Religious Life course of study in the Graduate Division of Religion at Emory University. Her work navigates the intersections of religion, health and healing, particularly related to women's reproductive health and gender-based violence. She has experience in public health research and practice, which she brings to her theological scholarship. Hardison-Moody's current work is an ethnographic study of women's practices of resistance, survival and care for those who have experienced gender-based violence.
Tracey E. Hucks is an associate professor of religion at Haverford College in Pennsylvania. Her research interests includes history of religion in America, African American religious history in the U.S., and African religions in the Americas.
Melissa Browning is a doctoral candidate in Christian Ethics at Loyola University Chicago. Her current academic project focuses on the lived experiences of HIV positive women in Mwanza, Tanzania.
Jeanine Viau is a doctoral student in Christian Ethics at Loyola University Chicago. Her dissertation project focuses on sexual justice in US education, and the relationship between cultural narratives and agency in the LGBTQ youth activist movement.
Eunice Karanja Kamaara is Associate Professor of Religious Studies at Moi University, Eldoret, Kenya and Affiliate professor of Indiana University Purdue University Indianapolis, US. Kamaara has special interests in International research Ethics.
Elisabeth T. Vasko is an Assistant Professor of Theology at Duquesne University. Her current research examines suffering, beauty, and the symbol of the cross in light of feminist hermeneutics.
Damaris S. Parsitau is a Lecturer of African Christianities at Egerton University in Kenya. She is finalizing her doctorate thesis on Neo-Pentecostalism and Civic Engagement in Kenya. Her areas of interests include Global Pentecostalism, Religion and Gender, Transnational Religious Movements, Religion and Civic Engagement, Religion and Popular Culture and Religion and Politics.
Edith Kayeli Chamwama is a doctoral candidate at the University of Nairobi. Her current academic project is an Investigation of the role and meaning of Birth, naming, marriage and death rituals among the Maragoli of Western Kenya in view of Roman Catholic Inculturation.
Sussy Gumo Kurgat is a senior lecturer in the Department of Religion, Theology and Philosophy- Maaseno University, Kenya. She holds a PhD from Maseno University [2005], MA in Religion and BEd from University of Nairobi-Kenya. Areas of research interest include feminist theology, gender studies, religion and development, research methods, comparative religion, ethics and religion and human rights.
Emily Reimer-Barry is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Theology and Religious Studies at the University of San Diego. In her research she explores the intersection of Catholic social and sexual teachings. Her current project focuses on HIV-prevention in U.S. prisons from a common good approach.
Todd David Whitmore is Associate Professor of Christian Ethics in the Department of Theology and Faculty Fellow in the Kroc Institute for International Peace Studies at the University of Notre Dame. He is also co-founder and president of PeaceHarvest (peaceharvest.org), a nongovernmental organization that combines agricultural development and peacebuilding in northern Uganda and South Sudan. He has been doing fieldwork in the region since 2005.
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Courtney T. Goto is a doctoral candidate in the Person, Community and Religious Life course of study of the Graduate Division of Religion at Emory University. Her dissertation, entitled "Artistic Play: Seeking the God of the Unexpected," sets forth a practical theology of play through art, and explores issues of body, imagination, teaching and learning for adults through two case studies. In the first case, Goto investigates how participants of InterPlay, based in Oakland, California, are creating selves by engaging in improvisational theater, movement, and vocal music. In the second case, Goto compares the ways in which a Japanese-American congregation in Sacramento, California discovers connections between faith and culture through play, Japanese artifacts, and aesthetics. Performance theory and object-relations aesthetics serve as theoretical lenses.
Jessica M. Smith is a doctoral student in the Theological Studies course of study of the GDR. Her academic interests center around feminist and womanist scholarship in contemporary Christian theology. She utilizes feminist and womanist literature, feminist theory, and post-structuralist thought as sources for her constructive theological work.  Currently, she is interested in re-imagining angelic revelation as a redemptive epistemology for the transformation of self and community.
David King is a doctoral student in the Historical Studies course of study of the Graduate Division of Religion at Emory University. Trained as a scholar of American religions, he employs ethnographic and historical methods to explore the complexity of twentieth-century American evangelicalism, depicting its diverse practices and ideologies. King's current work examines the evolving understandings of mission and public policy within evangelical non-governmental organizations. As an ordained minister, King is also committed to researching and responding to issues of practice within local communities of faith. His recent work has followed the formation of a Hispanic storefront congregation, as well as the short-term missions program of a suburban megachurch.
Samira Mehta is a doctoral candidate in the American Religious Cultures course of study. Her dissertation focuses on Christian-Jewish interfaith families in the late twentieth century United States, a project in which she explores the dynamics of familial religious practice and experience through the lens of cultural history. Mehta's project translates conversations about pluralism in American religion to familial religious practices, and examines the cultural construction of Christian-Jewish interfaith families through a close examination of popular culture. The ethnographic portion of her dissertation involves interviewing families about their own religious practices, with particular analytic attention paid to areas of innovation. Her project also explores dynamics of community outreach to interfaith families.
Haemin Lee is a doctoral student in the Person, Community, and Religious Life course of study of the GDR at Emory University. Born in Seoul, Haemin has a longstanding interest in utilizing academic knowledge in the service of humanity, bridging the gap between the academy of religion and religious practices at international and inter-religious levels. As an ordained Presbyterian minister (PC(USA)), Haemin has served as a pastor in Brazilian, African, Korean, and American congregations and as a chaplain at Harvard and Emory hospitals, Saint Francis House in Boston, and UNICEF. Haemin is generally interested in Christian global missions in conjunction with intercultural studies, postcolonialism, postmodernism, developmental psychology, and cultural anthropology. His current ethnographic research focuses on Korean Christian transnational NGO groups. Haemin holds degrees from Emory (Th.M.), Harvard (M.Div.), and Yonsei (B.A.).
Matthew Bersagel Braley is a doctoral student in the Ethics and Society course of study of the Graduate Division of Religion at Emory University. He works at the intersection of religion and global health in Africa and the African Diaspora. He is a member of the African Religious Health Assets Program, an international network of scholars and practitioners employing assets-based development approaches to understand the contribution of religion in healthcare. At Emory he served as executive director of Southern Truth and Reconciliation, a university-community partnership highlighting reconciliation practices of communities confronting legacies of racial violence. Prior to graduate studies, he directed youth programs in churches and other non-profit organizations.
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